Rohingya Solidarity Organization (RSO)

Burma's Muslim Rohingya minority is subjected to "severe legal, economic, and social discrimination," in addition to the forced labor and other abuses commonly faced by the country's other ethnic minority groups, according to the U.S. State Department human rights report. Rohingyas lack citizenship, making them ineligible for public education beyond the primary level and for most civil service jobs. The Rohingya Solidarity Organization (RSO) came into existence around 1980 to help Rohinhyans achieve citizenship and procure their rights as Burmese (Myan Mar) citizens. The RSO became the main and most militant faction among the Rohingyas in Bangladesh and on the border. Given its more rigid religious stand, the RSO soon secured the support of like-minded groups in the Muslim world. These included the Jamaat-e-Islami in Bangladesh and Pakistan, Gulbuddin Hekmatyar's Hizb-e-Islami in Afghanistan, Hizb-ul-Mujahideen (HM) in Jammu and Kashmir, and Angkatan Belia Islam sa-Malaysia…

Rohingya Solidarity Organization (RSO), also known as RSO, Rohingiya Solidarity Organization is an active group formed c. 1982.
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